Sir Hal makes me run distances.

Ok, here it is lovers.  I have 11 weeks to train for my half.  I could feasibly not really train at all and complete it, but I want to beat my original time of 1:58. Oh and by the way, in no way do I think I’m super awesome at running that I’m like, Heyyy, novice training is for…novices.  But I know my times in shorter distances have proved to need some tweaking and pushing to be somewhat respectable. 

Since I decided to go with the intermediate program, I’ve decided to let you know what Sir Hal has to say about trying an intermediate program:

THE ABOVE SCHEDULE IS FOR EXPERIENCED RUNNERS: individuals who have left their Novice roots behind and who want to improve their performances. You should be capable of running 30 to 60 minutes a day, five to seven days a week, have competed in at least a few 5-K and 10-K races, if not a marathon, and at least be willing to consider the possibility that some speedwork might help you improve. If that sounds like too much training, and this is your first half marathon, you might be more comfortable training using the Novice Program.

Ok, I think I can handle that.

But…Its Day One and…well… I get to stretch and strength train.  I added a widget to my side profile so that you can keep up with my training, but obviously no miles are added for today.  I’m just going to hang out at Golds Gym; lift some weights and elliptical the place UP!

You want to know more about strength training when trying to improve your running performance? Here is what Hal has to say about strength training c/o Cathy Vasto.

Go High/Low: If you’re training for a race like the Gate River Run, you don’t want to bulk up. Extra weight will slow you down. To avoid putting on pounds, keep the pounds of the weights you lift low and the repetitions high. Vasto recommends lifting 50 to 60 percent of the maximum weight you can lift in a set of 12 repetitions. Two sets of 12 work well for most of the lifts described later. For maximum benefits, without wasting a lot of time, do your strength training two or three times a week, after you run, not before.

Look Good Lifting: Keep your form—not for vanity, but to prevent injury. Think 90-degrees. Most seated lifts work best if your body parts are at right angles: legs straight, feet flat against the floor, trunk erect, chin up, eyes forward. Practice the pelvic tilt where you press your torso back against the chair, or floor, to keep your back from slumping. “Good form works in lifting as much as it does in running,” says Vasto.

Breathe Right: The worst mistake you can make while lifting is to hold your breath. That simply tightens the muscles that you want to keep loose. Inhale while you prepare to lift the weight, then exhale while lifting it, inhaling again while lowering it. “The best way to breathe is naturally,” says Vasto, “so that you’re not even aware you’re doing it.”

Rest by Stretching: When moving from exercise to exercise, don’t rush and don’t waste time chit-chatting with friends. Stay focused on your workout by stretching in between. “It’s very important while strength training to have a stretching routine,” warns Vasto. “You don’t want to lose your flexibility, which can happen if you forget to stretch. Eccentric contractions (which occur when lowering the weights) actually can tighten the muscles.” Stretching while strength training provides a double dose of conditioning in a minimum of time. (For six sensational stretching exercises, see: Stretch.)

Look what happens when you start to strength train.  You look like my DAD!

 

 Also, the Athletarian is doing a giveaway from her blog HERE!!



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4 thoughts on “Sir Hal makes me run distances.

  1. Thanks for inspiring me to get off my backside and do a few strength/stretch exercises – not that I'll ever look like your dad!
    Here's wishing you well in your forthcoming half marathon.

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